Does Lock & Load Work?

Can Gorilla Mind's 'Lock & Load' deliver on promises of increased semen volume and better orgasms? Let's take a peek. While it's packed with elements like Zinc and Selenium, known for boosting male fertility, it's also loaded with a hefty serving of nine capsules a day, including unproven ingredients like Nitrosigine and L-Lysine. Yes, it features heavyweights like Pygeum and Lecithin, but with more streamlined competitors out there, 'Lock & Load' might not be your MVP in the bedroom performance boost.
By
reviewed
Reviewed by
Last updatedLast updated: December 29, 2023
JoyNights is reader-supported. We may earn a commission through products purchased using links on this page. Learn more about our process here

“Lock & Load” by Gorilla Mind: A review of the ingredients

“Lock & Load” is a dietary supplement from Gorilla Mind, crafted to amp up semen volume, heighten orgasms, and improve sperm health. It’s part of the competition chasing the high bar set by Load Boost in the area of ejaculation enhancement. Billed as a concoction of natural goodies, it’s often mentioned in the same breath as better sexual performance. So, does “Lock & Load” live up to its hype? Let’s roll up our sleeves, dig into the ingredient list, and size up their effectiveness based on up-to-date science talk.

Dissecting the Ingredients of Lock & Load

Vitamin E

Although a handy antioxidant, there’s no real solid proof backing up Vitamin E’s role in semen or sperm health.

Zinc

This is one essential mineral that’s a big deal in male fertility. Plenty of zinc is linked with more sperm, better-moving sperm, and overall healthier sperm. It’s known that zinc supplementation can ramp up semen volume and fix any issues with semen consistency.

Selenium

Selenium is a key trace mineral tangled up in a lot of bodily processes. There’s some chatter that selenium could have a say in sexual health due to its critical role in DNA synthesis, reproductive health, and protecting against oxidative damage and infection. But as for pumping up semen volume, the science isn’t there yet.

Vitamin D3

Known as cholecalciferol too, Vitamin D3 is a must-have for good health all round. It helps keep your bones strong, your immune system functioning, and inflammation in check. While there’s no hard-and-fast evidence that it cranks up semen volume, a few studies have suggested that a Vitamin D deficiency might be tied to poorer quality sperm.

Lecithin

In animal studies, lecithin has been shown to boost both semen volume and sperm motility. It’s a thumbs-up for sperm health and overall fertility.

Nitrosigine

Nitrosigine is a fancy patented ingredient that’s a combo of arginine and silicon. Often found in pre-workout supplements, it’s used for its potential to supercharge nitric oxide levels, promoting blood flow. Though better blood flow could, in theory, up your game in the bedroom, there’s no concrete scientific proof that Nitrosigine impacts semen volume or sperm health.

L-Lysine

L-Lysine is an essential amino acid, crucial for making proteins, producing hormones, and supporting immune function. Even though it’s found in a bunch of supplements, there’s no science to back up the claim that L-Lysine has an effect on semen volume or sperm health.

Pygeum

A staple in traditional medicine, this ingredient’s famous benefits mostly revolve around prostate health and pee flow. Pygeum can give a boost to prostate function and can also up the semen volume. It’s a star player in any supplement claiming to increase semen volume.

Is Gorilla Mind’s Lock & Load Worth It?

So Can it help you cum more? With a hefty 9-capsule-a-day serving, Lock & Load is a bit of a handful, literally. Sadly, it seems most of that volume is committed to Nitrosigine and L-Lysine, neither of which have any scientific support for improving semen volume. Despite packing in a load of these not-so-effective ingredients, Lock & Load does feature some of the big hitters like Pygeum, Zinc, and Lecithin, which makes it potentially more effective than Semenax. Lock & Load isn’t a total dud and could do some good, but it’s overshadowed by more streamlined supplements like Load Boost.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *